Morris Arboretum’s 2017-2018 Lecture Series Returns this October

The Morris Arboretum Lecture Series returns this fall with fascinating topics that are about more than gardening, but with a common thread that connects us to our natural, green world.

“I always enjoy the varied topics of the Arboretum’s lecture series and this year’s speakers are particularly exciting” commented Arboretum member and friend, Maureen Flanagan.

The lecture series kicks off on Wednesday, October 11 at 7pm withWhat’s Hot! What’s Not! with The Perennial Diva, Stephanie Cohen.  Most people are aware of trends in clothes, furniture and even movies. Did you know there are also trends in horticulture? Retro flowers and vegetables become hot and new plants and garden techniques become passé.  Stephanie will dish the dirt on all kinds of trends waxing and waning in the garden. The diva doesn’t mince words, so be prepared to learn and laugh at her presentation! Cohen has a BS in horticulture and an MS in ecological studies. She was an instructor at Temple University for more than 20 years where she helped start the campus arboretum and has received awards from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Perennial Plant Association, American Nursery and Landscape Association, and was named an Alumni Fellow by Temple University.

For the next lecture, join Robert Peck, senior fellow of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and author of a new book, “The Natural History of Edward Lear” on Wednesday, November 15, 2 pm for his talk, The Natural History of Edward Lear. This lecture is being presented in partnership with the Ambler Theater, and will be held at Ambler Theatre at 108 East Butler Avenue, Ambler, PA.

Best known and much loved for “The Owl and the Pussycat” and other nonsense poetry, Edward Lear(1812-1888) was also a fine painter of birds, mammals, reptiles, and landscapes and an adventurous, worldwide traveler.  Robert Peck will detail the remarkable life and natural history paintings of this beloved children’s writer, who abruptly and mysteriously abandoned his scientific work soon after he achieved preeminence in the field.  Mr. Peck is the curator of art and artifacts at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, and was a guest curator of a bicentennial exhibition of Edward Lear’s natural history paintings at Harvard University’s Houghton Library.

 

The lecture series concludes on Thursday, December 7, 2pm with Joan Maloof, ecologist, author, and professor emeritus of Salisbury University, with The Living Forest: New Knowledge about the Forest and New Ideas About How to Save It.

Scientists are hard at work uncovering fascinating new information about how forests function and the lives of the organisms that live within them.  During this talk for tree lovers, Maloof, ecologist, author, and professor emeritus of Salisbury University, will share some of the latest findings from the forest.  She will also share her passion and ideas about saving these complex ecosystems.  Preserving old-growth forests enables us to learn more, enjoy more, and maintain biodiversity for the future.  If you’ve ever felt the call to help save forests, but didn’t know where to begin, Maloof will help inspire and guide you. Joan Maloof’s books include Teaching the Trees (2005), Among the Ancients (2011) and Nature’s Temples:  the Complex World of Old-Growth Forests (2016).  In addition to her research and writing, she founded the Old-Growth Forest Network, an organization with the goal of creating a network of protected forests across the U.S.

Lectures are supported in part by the Klein Lecture Endowment given in memory of Dr. William M. Klein who served from 1977-1990 as the Arboretum’s first full-time director; the Laura L. Barnes Lecture Endowment of The Philadelphia Foundation, given in memory of Laura Barnes by students and alumni of her school of horticulture; and the Byron Lukens Lecture Endowment, given in memory of educator and Arboretum volunteer, Byron Lukens and his wife Elizabeth.

 

The Morris Arboretum Lecture series talks in October and December will be held at Morris Arboretum’s Widener Visitor Center; November’s lecture will be held at Ambler Theater. The cost for each lecture is $15 for Arboretum members and $20 for non-members, which includes admission to the garden for the October and December talks.  Advanced registration and payment are required.  Please call 215-247-5777, ext. 125 oreducation@morrisarboretum.org to make your reservation.

The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania is located at 100 East Northwestern Avenue in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia.  The 92-acre horticulture display garden features a spectacular collection of mature trees in a beautiful and colorful landscape. The Arboretum includes numerous picturesque spots such as a formal rose garden, historic water features, a swan pond, and the only remaining freestanding fernery in North America. A new permanent nationally award winning exhibit, Out on a Limb – a Tree Adventure Exhibit adds to Morris Arboretum’s allure by transporting visitors 50 feet up into the treetops on a canopy walk that requires no climbing.  The Morris Arboretum’s new Horticulture Center Complex has received Platinum Level LEED® Certification, the highest sustainability rating of the U.S. Green Building Council. For more information, visitwww.morrisarboretum.org.

Photo Credit:  Rob Cardillo

Photo Caption: The Morris Arboretum Lecture Series returns this fall with fascinating topics that are about more than gardening, but with a common thread that connects us to our natural, green world.  The lecture series kicks off on Wednesday, October 11 at 7pm with What’s Hot! What’s Not! with The Perennial Diva,Stephanie Cohen.  Advanced registration and payment are required.  Please call 215-247-5777, ext. 125 oreducation@morrisarboretum.org to make your reservation.