Morris Arboretum’s Lecture Series,

Connections Beyond Our Garden – Talks on People, Plants and Place Returns this October

Morris Arboretum presents Connections Beyond Our Gardens – Talks on People, Plants and Place. Back by popular demand for its seventh year, ‘Connections’ will feature three lectures by speakers who depict the fascinating connections between people and the natural world.

The lecture series kicks off on Wednesday, October 5 at 2pm with nationally recognized artist, Diane Burko, presenting The Intersection of Art & the Environment.  For 40 years, Burko, pictured here, has been painting and photographing dramatic landscapes from the ground and from the air, including the Grand Canyon, volcanoes, the Wissahickon, and now glaciers. Her current work reflects expeditions to the three largest ice fields in the world found in Greenland, Antarctica and Patagonia. Burko has evolved from an artist who created images about the beauty of the earth, to someone who uses her art to help us understand that our resources are not unlimited, and our planet requires as much nurturing from us as we do from it. Her widely exhibited works can be found in numerous public and private collections across the country.

 

For your next connection, meet New York Times bestselling author Andrea Wulf, on Wednesday, November 9 at 2pm for her talk, The Invention of Nature:  Alexander von Humboldt’s New World. This lecture is being presented in partnership with the Ambler Theater, and will be held at Ambler Theatre at 108 East Butler Avenue, Ambler, PA. In her latest book published in late 2015, Andrea Wulf brings the story of Alexander von Humboldt back to life, taking us on a fantastic and challenging voyage in his footsteps. Wulf explores Humboldt’s ideas and how they go on to revolutionize science, conservation and preservation, nature writing, politics, art and the theory of evolution. In 1800, Humboldt recognized the impact of human induced climate change. Wulf reintroduces us to a lost hero of science and the forgotten father of environmentalism, showing us why understanding his vision of the world has become increasingly important today. The Invention of Nature won the 2015 Costa Biography Award, the 2016 LA Times Book Prize for Science & Technology, and was selected as one of the New York Times “10 Best Books of 2015.”

The Connections Beyond Our Garden lecture series concludes on Wednesday, December 7 at 2pm with Derrick Pitts, Hon.D Chief Astronomer, Franklin Institute, with “The Greening of Space: Trees on Other Planets?” Pitts tackles what we really know about the universe, what we think we know, and what questions astronomers most want to answer. In his talk, Pitts explores whether there’s actually a chance that after hundreds of light years of travel in the most spartan of accommodations, we could arrive at a very familiar place; trees, grass, lakes, streams and oxygen!

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Derrick Pitts is currently the Chief Astronomer and Director of the Fels Planetarium at The Franklin Institute. He appears regularly in the national media as a science content expert.  For more than two decades, he has also hosted award-winning astronomy radio programs for Philadelphia’s two public radio stations and created signature astronomy television programming for PBS. His motto is “Eat, breathe, do science. Sleep later.”

Lectures are supported in part by the Klein Lecture Endowment given in memory of Dr. William M. Klein who served from 1977-1990 as the Arboretum’s first full-time director, the Laura L. Barnes Lecture Endowment of The Philadelphia Foundation, given in memory of Laura Barnes by students and alumni of her school of horticulture, and the Byron Lukens Lecture Endowment, given in memory of educator and Arboretum volunteer, Byron Lukens and his wife Elizabeth.

 

The Connections Beyond Our Garden October and December lectures are held at Morris Arboretum’s Widener Visitor Center at 2pm; November’s lecture is held at Ambler Theater. The cost for each lecture is $15 for Arboretum members and $20 for non-members, which includes admission to the garden.  Advanced registration and payment are required.  Please call 215-247-5777, ext. 125 or education@morrisarboretum.org to make your reservation.

The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania is located at 100 East Northwestern Avenue in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia.  The 92-acre horticulture display garden features a spectacular collection of mature trees in a beautiful and colorful landscape. The Arboretum includes numerous picturesque spots such as a formal rose garden, historic water features, a swan pond, and the only remaining freestanding fernery in North America. A new permanent nationally award winning exhibit, Out on a Limb – a Tree Adventure Exhibit adds to Morris Arboretum’s allure by transporting visitors 50 feet up into the treetops on a canopy walk that requires no climbing.  The Morris Arboretum’s new Horticulture Center Complex has received Platinum Level LEED® Certification, the highest sustainability rating of the U.S. Green Building Council. For more information, visit www.morrisarboretum.org.

diane-burko-bestPhoto Credit:  Courtesy, Diane Burko

Photo Caption: Morris Arboretum presents Connections Beyond Our Gardens – Talks on People, Plants and Place. Back by popular demand for its seventh year, ‘Connections’ will feature three lectures by speakers who depict the fascinating connections between people and the natural world.  The lecture series kicks off on Wednesday, October 5 at 2pm with nationally recognized artist, Diane Burko, presenting The Intersection of Art & the Environment.  Advanced registration and payment are required.  Please call 215-247-5777, ext. 125 or education@morrisarboretum.org to make your reservation.