Morris Arboretum Awarded the Highest Level of Arboretum Accreditation

Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania has once again been awarded the highest level of accreditation, Level IV, from ArbNet.  An Arboretum Accreditation Program, ArbNet is set-up to establish and share a widely recognized set of industry standards for the purpose of unifying the arboretum community. No other international program of accreditation exists that is specific to arboreta.  Achieving Level IV status makes Morris Arboretum one of only 19 arboreta world-wide to achieve this rank.

 

ArbNet, which is administered by the Morton Arboretum, is an interactive, collaborative, international community of arboreta and tree-focused professionals. This program facilitates the sharing of knowledge, experience, and other resources to help arboreta meet their institutional goals and works to raise professional standards. To achieve Level IV accreditation, an arboretum must have the following criteria:

  • A scientific and/or conservation staff and capability to collaborate in scientific or conservation activities with other arboreta or organizations related to trees.
  • Institutional capacity, stability, and commitment to hold and safeguard plants of collections or conservation value on behalf of the collective interests of the profession.
  • Specific participation in collaborative scientific or conservation activities related to trees, such as the North American Plant Collections Consortium or the Global Trees Campaign.
  • Specific consideration of a conservation role linked to the Global Trees Campaign (globaltrees.org)

Speaking on behalf of the Morris Arboretum, The Gayle E. Maloney Director of Horticulture and Curator, Tony Aiello said, “It is exciting and gratifying to once again achieve this status, something that less than 20 arboreta world-wide have achieved.  This level of certification acknowledges all of the work that we do in botanical and horticultural research and recognizes the significance of our diverse living collection.  This collection not only provides interest to visitors throughout the year but is a scientific resource that is used for in-house and external research.  The ArbNet system allows arboreta to communicate the value of preserving trees in a changing world and I am proud of everyone who contributes to making the Morris arboretum the great resource that it is.”

The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania is located at 100 East Northwestern Avenue in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia.  The 92-acre horticulture display garden features a spectacular collection of mature trees in a beautiful and colorful landscape. The Arboretum includes numerous picturesque spots such as a formal rose garden, historic water features, a swan pond, and the only remaining freestanding fernery in North America. The arboretum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is also the official arboretum of Pennsylvania. A permanent nationally award winning exhibit, Out on a Limb – a Tree Adventure Exhibit adds to Morris Arboretum’s allure by transporting visitors 50 feet up into the treetops on a canopy walk that requires no climbing.  Open weekdays 10am-4pm and weekends 10am-5pm (Apr-Oct).  Open late on Wednesdays in June, July, and August until 8:00pm.  For more information, visit www.morrisarboretum.org.

Photo Credit:  Paul W. Meyer

Photo caption:  Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania has once again been awarded the highest level of accreditation, Level IV, from ArbNet.  An Arboretum Accreditation Program, ArbNet is set-up to establish and share a widely recognized set of industry standards for the purpose of unifying the arboretum community. No other international program of accreditation exists that is specific to arboreta.  Achieving Level IV status makes Morris Arboretum one of only 19 arboreta world-wide to achieve this rank. Shown here, from Morris Arboretum’s collection, is a Katsura tree (Cercidphyllum japonicum) planted by the Morris founders circa 1902 as part of their Japanese garden. It is one of the largest trees of its kind in North America.